Category: Uncategorized

THAT SHIP HAS SAILED: Why the US should stop shipping American-grown food abroad

The development of the Food for Peace program was the US’s first program for fighting international hunger. This program focuses heavily on donating commodities to vulnerable populations abroad. Most donated goods are grown domestically and shipped to developing countries where over three billion people have received assistance since its inception. It is estimated that another eight to twelve million people could receive help by reforming US food aid policies. A major barrier to expanding reach is the shipment of US agricultural goods abroad. This is a practice that should be eliminated because it is harmful in the following ways:

1. It is time-consuming.

Shipping US grown goods abroad takes on average 126 days. In emergency situations, people are only able to survive for 12 days without foods. In many instances, waiting for US commodities to ship is deadly.

2. It wastes money on transportation fees.

Between 2003 and 2012, the US spent close to $18 billion on food aid. Over half of this money was used on international transportation fees. Money that could be used to feed millions was used to support US-based shipping companies and the transport of good.

3. It cripples international agricultural sectors.

US grown food is sold at a much lower cost than food sold by local farmers. This can put local farmers out of business if they are unable to compete with the sale of US products. Resultantly, communities become completely dependent on aid.

We should discontinue the practice of shipping US commodities abroad and instead support international agricultural ventures. Learn more about FY 2016 reform proposals here.

What is DACA?

There has been a lot of buzz around “DACA” the last couple days; which has left many of us wondering, “what is DACA?” The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrival program, or DACA, was enacted by the Obama Administration in June 2012. The program

The program had granted undocumented immigrant children, who entered the U.S. before their 16th birthday, a renewable two-year deportation protection and work permit while they either worked, attended school, or served in the military. However, it did not provide lawful status to those within the program.

DACA had nearly 800,000 immigrants enrolled in the program before President Trump ended the program this week. Survey data shows that 91% of those in the DACA program were currently employed and that number goes up to 93% for those 25 and older.

While some have thought President Trump did this to open up more jobs for American citizens, it is obvious there was not much thought given to those who are currently enrolled in DACA. Now, without DACA, the enrollees have to reevaluate everything they had planned for their lives. How will they be able to work to provide for their family? How will they pay for schooling? How will they be eligible to keep their position in the military?

 

Sincerely,

AB

Do you have an Advance Directive?

Everyone deserves the right to make their own decisions about their health. But sometimes we may found ourselves in certain circumstances in which we are unable to do so, such as during a coma, terminal illness, or serious injury. An important way that we can communicate our decisions during these times, however, is by having an “advance directive” in place.

Advance directives are written, legal documents that outline your decisions regarding medical care when you are unable to make them. They assist doctors and caregivers in making medical decisions on your behalf, and they can be written at any age.

There are several types of advance directives:

Health care power of attorney (also called “durable power of attorney for health care” or “health care proxy”). This is a type of advance directive in which you appoint a person you trust to make medical decisions on your behalf when you are unable to do so. This may be a family member, partner, or friend.

Living will. This is a written, legal document that outlines your wishes for certain medical or end-of-life care treatments. These may range from mechanical ventilation to tube feeding, to even organ and tissue donations.

Do-Not-Resuscitate Orders (DNR). This order informs health care providers not to perform CPR if your breathing or heart were to stop.

While advance directives are not required, it may be a good idea to have one in place so that you can have peace of mind knowing that you’re in control of your health care in the event that you are unable to make decisions for yourself.

It should be noted that state requirements regarding advance directives, such as living wills, may vary, so be sure to check your local state laws if you decide to create one for yourself. Also, be sure to keep a copy of your living will for yourself, as well as provide copies to family members, health care providers, and your health care power of attorney. Advance directives can be changed at any time, but just be sure to redistribute copies as necessary.

For more information about advance directives, check out the following resource links:

Advance Care Planning | UNC Health Care: UNC Medical Center

Living Wills and Health Care Powers of Attorney | North Carolina Bar Association

Living Wills and Advance Directives for Medical Decisions | Mayo Clinic

References:

Advance care directives. (2017, September 5). Retrieved from https://medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000472.htm

Advance directives. (2017, July 24). Retrieved from https://medlineplus.gov/advancedirectives.html#summary

Creating advance directives. (2014, November 11). Retrieved from http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/consumer-health/in-depth/living-wills/art-20046303?pg=2

Living wills and advance directives for medical decisions. (2014, November 11). Retrieved from http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/consumer-health/in-depth/living-wills/art-20046303

 

Are you accepting toxic food advice?

If you’re a health junkie or on social media at all, you’ve probably seen these terms: registered dietitian, nutritionist, nutrition coach, food guru, etc.. With so much information flying around there’s a lot of confusion over what it all means and who to listen to when it comes to nutrition advice. My answer? It all depends! All of these titles embody a love of food but there are some big differences in who to look to for food advice. Let’s set the record straight.

Registered Dietitian

Registered dietitians (RDs), also called registered dietitian nutritionists (RDNs), are recognized as experts of food and nutrition in the medical field. This is largely because of the many years these professionals spend studying the science behind food and how it affects the body. The government has regulations on who can call themselves a “registered dietitian”. This is to protect the public from people who present themselves as nutrition experts, but who have no formal training. For example, if someone with diabetes accepts nutrition advice from a nutritionist and it hurts them the nutritionist can not be held accountable. Registered dietitians, on the other hand, can lose their license or suffer fines for providing poor nutrition advice.  This is because RDs go through extensive training before they can practice. As of 2017, RDs are required to complete the following:

  • a bachelor’s or advanced degree in food science or human nutrition
  • supervised training and internships
  • pass the RD exam

After RDs are certified, they also have to complete annual training to maintain their credentials. This is my field of study and the past two years I’ve spent work toward a masters in this field has not been easy, but I’m so close to the finish line! From my studies, it seems RDs are excellent in a number of areas. They really understand how to help manage medical conditions and weight loss. They also can point out what diet trends are completely bogus with science.

Nutritionists/Nutrition Coach/Food Guru

Terms like nutritionist, nutrition coach and the like are not regulated. Anyone can use these labels. This isn’t to say they don’t have valuable nutrition knowledge. Many nutritionists have a wealth of nutrition knowledge from experience and self-study. Some of my favorite nutritionist on Facebook and Instagram provide excellent recipe ideas and encourage their followers to make healthy choices with amazing food photography. On the other hand, following nutrition advice from individuals not formally trained in food science can be dangerous. A nutritionist might not fully understand nutrition information or they may be misinformed. This can be dangerous if a nutritionist misinforms a large number of individuals, especially through social media platforms. Misinformation is particularly harmful when individuals are looking to receive information around serious medical conditions like diabetes and weight loss.

The next time you’re in search of food advice think about what you need! If you have a medical condition or you’re looking for advice on how to lose weight in a healthy way, you might want to look for advice from an RD. If you’re looking for meal prepping tips or fitness inspiration, a nutritionist can certainly help. There’s space for both in this food lovers community.

Looking at the Hunter-Gatherer Gut

There are anywhere from 10-100 trillion microbes that thrive in the human body. They help maintain normal body conditions, facilitate with digestion, and are really important to our immune systems. Some of these are permanent whereas others are transient. Your own microbiota will change over the course of your life, strongly influenced by diet among other factors. An article published last week in Science magazine says these changes may even have once been seasonal.

Their logic is based on a study conducted with the Hadza community in Tanzania. These hunter-gatherers have a diet that must be much closer to that of our earliest ancestors, rooted in foraging as opposed to agriculture. The Hadza suffer much less from digestive illness–Chron’s, colitis, colon cancer–than do modern Westerners. Though the pattern of gut microbes found have yet to be more seriously researched, there seems to be health benefits of eating seasonally. Some scientists are tentatively naming this synchronization of food ingested and microbes in the gut a biorhythm of sorts.

This is certainly not the first time the hunter-gatherer diet has been looked to for inspiration. The Paleo Diet fad/trend is based in this vein of thought. It’s rich in natural proteins and fats, carbs from fruits and roots, and eliminates dairy, grains, and the cheap highly processed foods that so conveniently line our grocery stores. It has its critics certainly, but it would be interesting to see if the Paleo dieter’s microbiota is more similar to that of the Hadza.

As research in this field continues, it’ll be interesting to see how parallels in diet and its effects on the gut will continue to inform our favorite apt saying: You are what you eat.

 

Fake Health News

Fake news has been dominating headlines over the past year. Although much of the publicity has been related to politics, fake news about health may be more widespread and difficult to identify.

But what exactly is fake news?

By definition, fake news is the deliberate spread of misinformation with the intention of making political or financial gain. Ultimately it may cause individuals to make health decisions that lead to harm or suffering.

How do you identify fake news?

HealthNewsReview.org is a health news watchdog at the University of Minnesota School of Public Health that offers 10 benchmarks to evaluate the truthfulness of health care reporting.

Before taking any article at face value, ask yourself the following questions. Answering no indicates a red flag for truthfulness or accuracy.

Does the story…

  1. sufficiently discuss the costs of the health intervention?
  2. adequately quantify the benefits of the intervention?
  3. avoid exaggerating potential benefits or ignoring potential harms?
  4. acknowledge the quality of evidence?
  5. avoid over-selling or exaggerating the findings?
  6. include comment from independent sources and identify potential conflicts of interest?
  7. compare the new intervention with those already available?
  8. clearly state how available the intervention is for consumers?
  9. show what is truly new or different about the intervention?
  10. mostly repeat a news release?

Kelly McBride, vice president of the Poynter Institute, acknowledged in an article in the Atlantic – “In science, good information is really boring. Science doesn’t leap ahead the way journalists like to cover it.”

Bottom Line: If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.

 

GOP Bill Halts in Senate

Remember back in May when the GOP health bill passed in the House? The momentum stopped there.
The Senate failed to pass a GOP-proposed Health Law yesterday. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell says they’re going to try again early next week, though it doesn’t seem like this will be a promising attempt either. Analysts attribute this to many deep-rooted factors:  the Republican party as a whole not unified behind an action plan other than repealing the ACA, the taking away of funding and resources without a viable exchange, and a severe lack of public hearings and drafting.
Provisions included in a draft of the bill last week including capping funding for Medicaid, and giving states the power to opt out of insurance regulations substantiated in the Affordable Care Act. This fielded much opposition from more moderate Republicans. They cite problems  such as too “deep cuts” to Medicaid, and an insufficient means to account for the expenses of changing the insurance system. This opposition was especially strong in Republican states like Ohio that had expanded Medicaid under the ACA.
Now, Republican Senators are working on re-drafting a “repeal and delay” bill that would phase out aspects of the ACA over a two year time frame–a version of this bill passed in 2015. Of note, the draft of this bill to be debated does not include an amendment proposed by Senator Ted Cruz. According to a report conducted by the Department of Health and Human Services, this amendment might actually result in broader coverage and lower premiums. The quality and correctness of this report is already under great criticism by healthcare and insurance analysts.
Sources: The New York Times, Kaiser Health News

Physiology and Space Travel

Next week will mark the 48th anniversary of the first manned moon landing, conducted by Apollo 11 on July 20th, 1969. It marked a momentous and patriotic moment for the United States, which remains the only country to have successfully accomplished this task, and for the field of aeronautics as a whole. Indeed, “a giant leap for mankind”! (more information about the landing itself here).

Long space missions like Apollo 11 are also a huge physiological feat. Conditions on Earth aren’t the same as they are in space, or on other celestial bodies. Microgravity and radiation effects, just to name two, are really different on the moon than they are here at home. When you go on a mission to Mars, for instance, your body goes through three separate gravity fields. And when you are in the spacecraft, you are exposed to a very contained and unique ecosystem. Scientists back home monitor saliva, urine and blood content to ensure latent viruses, like herpes or Epstein-Barr, are not reactivated.  Astronauts are also subject to about ten times more radiation than normal when they visit the space station, which can have immediate as well as longer term effects on the central nervous system.

As one article published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal sums it up, “astronauts are people with normal physiology who live in an abnormal environment”. Here are some changes the body makes in order to adapt, or acclimatize, to space travel (summarized from this nifty table here):

  • Fluid re-distribution (a temporary in-flight decreased flow to the legs, and increased flow to the head and torso)
  • Neurovestibular effects (the motion sickness astronauts can expect to feel when traveling)
  • Muscle mass changes (mass will decrease up to 30% and will regain/recover post-flight)
  • Bone demineralization (a loss of almost 60-70% in calcium, as well as decreased thyroid activity and Vitamin D production, which recovers upon returning to Earth)
  • Psychosocial effects (Weariness and emotional effects)
  • Immune dysregulation

There are some measures that can be taken to counter these effects, including the following: exercise, negative pressure space suits, anti-nausea medication, resistance training, diet supplements, and exposure to artificial gravity during flight.

Curious to learn more? Here are a few more fascinating reads to get you started from Harvard, the Smithsonian, and StatNews.

Side Note–if you’re a local NC reader, I hope you’ve visited Morehead Planetarium, on UNC’s Chapel Hill campus! Apollo mission astronauts Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin, and Michael Collins all trained here–as well as other space giants.

 

Turmeric’s Health Benefits

To this day, if I’m feeling a little under the weather, my parents will prescribe a healthy dose of turmeric. Sore throat? Teaspoon of turmeric in warm milk. Acne acting up? Make a turmeric paste. Feeling weary? Add some more turmeric in your veggies when you cook.

Turmeric is a naturally bitter spice, but my ma and pa are right–it’s somewhat of a super food! It’s an anti-oxidant as well as an anti-inflammatory agent. It’s also been known to have anti-fungal and anti-cancer properties.

Curcumin, the phytochemical that gives turmeric it’s trademark yellow color, makes up about 2-5% of turmeric, but is responsible for most of its recognized therapeutic effects. It was first extracted from turmeric in the early 1800s and since then has been used extensively in Asian cooking, religious ceremonies, and for medicinal purposes. It works by regulating transcription factors (proteins that are important in converting DNA to RNA, which then codes for genes). It is also thought to bind to cellular proteins, and to be able to help stop the growth of tumor cells.

But wait, there’s more! With that strong yellow color, it makes a very effective natural food coloring, and can function as a preservative of sorts. All in all, not a bad spice to throw in the mix every now and again.

I think I may just roll my eyes a little less the next time my mom tells me drink a warm cup of haldi (Hindi for turmeric) milk before bed.

Potato & Peas Stew

In the heat of June you wouldn’t expect to crave a warm stew. The summer storming we had last week, though, got me thinking about my mom’s comforting potato and pea stew. It’s warm, just a tad spicy, filling, and pretty healthy! Try it out next time the clouds look gloomy:

Ingredients:

4 tbsp oil

1 tbsp cumin seeds

3 large potatoes

1 12 oz bag of frozen peas

3 medium tomatoes

4 cloves garlic

2-4 oz water

Seasoning: turmeric, coriander powder, salt

Fresh cilantro, for garnish

 

Heat oil, then add in cumin seeds and minced garlic. Saute until golden brown. Add in cubed potatoes, and some water. Then cover and let cook until potatoes are almost done. Add in chopped tomatoes, mushing and mixing until well combined. Add in frozen peas. Season with salt, turmeric, and coriander powder, to taste.

When potatoes are cooked through, garnish with chopped cilantro.

Serve over rice or with naan/roti.

Enjoy 🙂