Category: Health Promotion

Recent Data on Obesity Prevalence in the U.S.

The National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) recently released a data brief on recent estimates for obesity prevalence in the United States. These estimates are from the most recent National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey for 2015-2016. Some key survey findings showed that in 2015-2016, obesity prevalence was 39.8% among adults and 18.5% among youth in the U.S. Additionally, obesity prevalence was found to be 13.9% for children aged 2-5 years, 18.4% for children aged 6-11 years, and 20.6% for children aged 12-19 years.

While there was not a significant change in obesity prevalence among U.S. adults and youth between 2013-2014 and 2015-2016, obesity continues to remain an important public health concern.

Obesity prevalence rates in the U.S. do not currently meet national weight status objectives set forth in Healthy People 2020, a 10-year national agenda for improving public health in the U.S. These objectives are to reduce the proportion of U.S. adults that are obese to 30.5%, as well as reduce the proportion of U.S. children aged 2-5 years, 6-11 years, and 12-19 years that are obese to 9.4%, 15.7%, and 16.1%, respectively, by the year 2020.

Obesity can lead to serious health effects, such as: high blood pressure, heart disease, and even type 2 diabetes. However, maintaining a healthy weight through eating right and staying physically active can prevent these negative health outcomes.

References

Prevalence of Obesity among Adults and Youth: United States, 2015-2016. (2017, October). Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/databriefs/db288.pdf

Nutrition and Weight Status. (2017, October 13). Retrieved from https://www.healthypeople.gov/2020/topics-objectives/topic/nutrition-and-weight-status/objectives

Eat Right. (N.d.). Retrieved from https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/educational/lose_wt/eat/index.htm

Be Physically Active. (N.d.) Retrieved from https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/educational/lose_wt/physical.htm

Flu Shot Season

When it comes to the flu shot, I trust in the CDC for their advice and present it as follows. Some vaccines contain inactive virus parts to three types of influenza while others have four. The predicted and included flu strains are educated guesses, so a quadrivalent vaccine might cover more bases. Search for flu shot locations around you and find out which they offer.

If an individual has never gotten the flu or the flu shot, they may not think they need to be vaccinated. This experienced phenomenon is often due to herd immunity, where the surrounding people in a population act as insulation against the flu because they were vaccinated and so not spreading it. Another common myth is that the flu shot will give you the flu though this is not the case. The body takes up to a few weeks after being exposed to the inactivated virus to develop antibodies, and while your immune system is working on this you may not feel at your best for a day or so. If I experience this, I remind myself how much worse the full-fledged flu virus feels. The flu shot may even decrease your risk by half.

October is the time to get it— read up on the flu shot and make a choice that best benefits your health and the health of those around you!

Teal Pumpkin Project: Promoting fun and safe Halloween treats for all

As my little one tries new foods, I pay close attention for any strange reactions that might indicate a food allergy. Food allergies are the result of an immune response to proteins found in food. The immune response can cause mild symptoms such as redness on the skin or an itchy mouth. Or it can cause more serious, life threatening symptoms, known as anaphylaxis, like trouble swallowing, shortness of breath, or loss of consciousness.

While more than 170 foods have been identified to cause allergic reactions, eight allergens are responsible for the majority, and the most severe, reactions in the United States. The ‘big’ eight include: egg, milk, peanut, tree nut, wheat, soy, fish, and shellfish.

It is estimated that upwards of 15 million people in the United States have food allergies, and that number is on the rise. A Centers for Disease Control & Prevention report states there is increasing prevalence of food allergies among children, and a recent media headline shared that insurance claims for anaphylactic (severe) food reactions are going up in adults too.

Although the reason(s) or cause(s) for these increases is unknown, what is known is that food allergies impact quality of life. Holidays can be a particularly challenging time for people with food allergies, but Food Allergy Research & Education (FARE) has initiated a worldwide movement to create a safer, happier Halloween for all. To support the movement, all you have to do is offer non-food treats, like bubbles or stickers, and place a teal pumpkin on your doorstep as a way to let families know you are safe for children with food allergies or other health concerns.

If Halloween is one of your favorite celebrations during the year, think about how a small change in what you hand out can allow others to experience the fun and tradition of trick-or-treating.

The TEAL PUMPKIN PROJECT and the Teal Pumpkin Image are trademarks of Food Allergy Research & Education (FARE)

 

Sources:                     

NIAID-Sponsored Expert Panel. Guidelines for the diagnosis and management of food allergy in the United States: Report of the NIAID-sponsored expert panel. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2010; 126(6):S1-58

Jackson KD, Howie LD, Akinbami LJ. Trends in allergic conditions among children: United States, 1997-2011. NCHS data brief, no 121. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics. 2013. Retrieved from http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/products/databriefs/db121.htm.

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health. Report of the NIH Expert Panel on Food Allergy Research. 2006. Retrieved from www.niaid.nih.gov/topics/foodallergy/research/pages/reportfoodallergy.aspx

United States Census Bureau Quick Facts (2015 estimates).

Shemesh E, Annunziato RA, Ambrose MA, Ravid NL, Mullarkey C, Rubes M, Chuang K, Sicherer M, Sicherer S. Child and parental reports of bullying in a consecutive sample of children with food allergy. Pediatrics 2013; 131:e10-e17.

Herbert L, Shemesh E, Bender B. Clinical management of psychosocial concerns related to food allergy. J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract. 2016; 4(2):205-213.

Bollinger ME; Dahlquist LM, Mudd K; Sonntag C, Dillinger L, McKenna K. The impact of food allergy on the daily activities of children and their families. Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2006; 96:415-421.

Food Allergy Research & Education. Teal Pumpkin Project. https://www.foodallergy.org/education-awareness/teal-pumpkin-project

CVS and the role of Pharmacies in the Opioid Crisis

This past week, CVS pharmacy announced another step in their response to the country’s ongoing opioid epidemic. They are expanding medication disposal options, by adding over 700 in store disposal units across the country. They also announced an expanded pharmacist counseling session for those prescribed opioids for the first time, to highlight the risks of addiction and dependence, while answering any patient questions. The CVS Health Foundation has additionally pledged $2 million to support federally qualified community health centers that deliver medication-assisted treatment.

On top of all of this, they have announced that they are limiting the prescription of opioids to seven days for acute prescriptions, limiting daily dose strengths, and requiring that immediate-release formulations of opioids to be used before prescribing extended release options. Not only does this make their practices consistent with recent CDC guidelines, but also as the largest pharmacy in the United States, CVS taking a stronger stance to limit the excess prescribing of opioids could set a precedent in the role that pharmacies play in the opioid crisis.

To combat this epidemic, we need buy in from facets of the medical industry, from individual doctors to health care systems, insurance companies and pharmacies, medication manufacturers and government officials. I commend CVS on their stance to address their role in this crisis, and hope that it serves as a moment of recognizing responsibility for this crisis. If we use evidence based interventions, and partnerships from behavioral health, to medicine, and governmental agencies, we can begin to reduce opioid dependence and addiction, and see a decrease in those lost to overdose.

Sources –

CVS Health Press Release – https://cvshealth.com/thought-leadership/cvs-health-enterprise-response-opioid-epidemic/cvs-health-responds-to-nations-opioid-crisis

CDC Opioid Prescribing Guidelines – https://www.cdc.gov/drugoverdose/prescribing/guideline.html

Breathe in… breathe out…

Feeling anxious or stressed? Consider diaphragmatic or “deep breathing” exercises! Deep breathing can be a helpful technique for relaxing both mind and body, as well as stress and anxiety management. It can even improve our energy levels!

With deep breathing, we are able to consciously control our breathing, lower our blood pressure and heart rate, and relax our muscles. During normal breathing, we typically breathe shallow breaths using our chest and not our bellies. However, with deep breathing, we breathe with our bellies, taking in slow, deep breaths.

One key muscle involved in the process of deep breathing is our diaphragm, located between our chest and abdomen. When we inhale, we contract our diaphragm, expanding our abdomen, which then pushes air into our lungs. We then exhale, relaxing our diaphragm, and air is pushed out of our lungs.

Interested in trying deep breathing? Click here for a step-by-step guide!

Happy stress relief!

References:

Diaphragmatic Breathing [PDF file]. (2016, September). Retrieved from https://www.uncmedicalcenter.org/app/files/public/196/pdf-medctr-rehab-diaphbreathing.pdf

Patel, S. (N.d.) Retrieved from http://www.chopra.com/articles/breathing-for-life-the-mind-body-healing-benefits-of-pranayama#sm.00019xogqb4t2eoex3f1a17fb6wn4

Rakal, D. (2016). Learning Deep Breathing. Psych Central. Retrieved from https://psychcentral.com/lib/learning-deep-breathing/

Wong, C. (2017, April 30). Retrieved from https://www.verywell.com/how-to-breathe-with-your-belly-89853

 

Farm Health and Safety Awareness

September 17-23 marks National Farm Health and Safety Week 2017. As someone who grew up on a Dairy and Crop Farm, I am all too familiar with the dangers that come along with a life in agriculture. From close calls, to the injuries of family members, to the tragic passing and near death experiences of neighbors and others in the community, the risk of injury and death was always in the back of my mind. My parents still operate our family farm together, juggling the responsibilities of keeping the farm going, raising grandchildren, and navigating health issues that someone who has grandchildren often begin to deal with (sorry mom and dad!).

The National Education Center for Agricultural Safety uses each day this week to highlight a different issue that faces those who work in the agricultural industry, and today marks farmer health. Where I’m from in the Thumb of Michigan, many of the local farms are operated by an aging population, who along with the risks involved with a farming lifestyle, are also coping with diseases associated with aging, such as arthritis and cancer. I encourage you to take the time to learn more about the Health of Farmers, and to appreciate the unique challenges that accompany the large scale agricultural work, and the impact that farming has on a national and global scale. More information is sourced below!

 

Sources –

National Education Center for Agricultural Safety National Farm Health and Safety Week 2017 – http://www.necasag.org/nationalfarmsafetyandhealthweek/

Helping Out After Natural Disasters

In recent weeks, there have been several catastrophic natural disasters. Arshya recently wrote about the public health aftermath of such disasters. Recovery from natural disasters must be comprehensive in that the safety, sanitation, and welfare of the people, animals, infrastructure, and environment of the affected communities must be addressed.

It is likely that you or someone you know has been impacted by the hurricanes or earthquake, which might leave you wondering how you can help. If you cannot provide time, many local, national, international, and online organizations will accept your donations. Before committing your resources, take a few minutes to do a little research to check whether a charity is legit. Charity Navigator is a trusted source for identifying organizations responding to natural disasters.

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) offers additional tips for wise giving after natural disasters:

  • Be wary of charities that seem to have appeared overnight.
  • Stick to charities that have a proven track record for dealing with disasters.
  • Designate the disaster so that your funds will be used directly instead of going in to a general fund.
  • When texting to donate, confirm the number with the source. Charges will show up on your phone bill but donations may not be immediate.

The FTC also offers tips for those affected by natural disasters:

  • Be skeptical of people or groups promising immediate clean-up or debris removal. Some may offer overly priced quotes for work, demand payment before ever doing work, or lack the necessary licenses or skills to complete the work.
  • Be on the lookout for rental listing scams that ask for sending money before actually visiting the property.
  • You may need to share personal information to gain access to resources, so make sure you know exactly who you are dealing with before sharing your social security number or financial information.

 

Sources:             

Federal Trade Commission. FTC Advise for Helping Hurricane Harvey Victims. August 28, 2017. https://www.ftc.gov/news-events/press-releases/2017/08/ftc-advice-helping-hurricane-harvey-victims

The Magic of Mindfulness

Do you ever feel overwhelmed with work, can’t stay focused in class, or simply feel down most of the time? If so, you may have gotten caught up in the whirlwind style of functioning known as “multitasking.” It is likely that we all have at some point or another and for some, there is no way around it, so what can we do to combat the stresses of the busy lifestyles of 2017?

You shouldn’t have to uproot your whole working style or job just to find peace of mind. Today I’m going to propose a solution that you may have overlooked, mindfulness meditation. The following are the benefits that we know of today:

  • Decreased anxiety
  • Decreased depression
  • Increased empathy
    • With decreased negative feelings like sadness, tension, and anger
  • Decreased stress
  • Increased focus
  • Decreased blood pressure
    • While also improving the transportation of oxygen and carbon-dioxide
  • Increased immune function

As you can see, mindfulness does a lot more than simply strengthen our ability to focus. While you will see some of these benefits after your first time, there is evidence showing that after 8 weeks of practice neurologists seen an increase in gray matter density in brain regions associated with learning, memory processing, and emotional regulation.

Mindfulness is just one style of meditation. There are myriad resources out there to help you get started, but Headspace is my favorite. Have you tried meditating before? If so, let me know your thoughts on the practice and your favorite style.

 

AB

PrEP for HIV Prevention? Here’s what you need to know

Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis, or PrEP, has changed the way in which we talk about HIV Prevention. After being approved for preventive use by the FDA in 2012, there has been a sharp increase in PrEP prescriptions in the U.S. over the past several years. Currently, the only prescription available for PrEP is Truvada, which also serves as a treatment drug for those who are HIV positive.

Truvada is a nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor, or an NRTI. When exposed to HIV, a NRTI works by masking itself as a building block of the virus’s genetic structure. While our own cells are able to recognize and correct for this coding mistake, HIV cannot, and as a result is unable to replicate and mount a widespread infection.

A quick distinction: Truvada as a drug is a form of PrEP, PrEP is a general class of preventive measures. Birth control can be thought of as a form of PrEP, preventing a pregnancy before it occurs. Even sunscreen is a form for PrEP. You apply lotion to prevent sunburn before it occurs.

But PrEP only works if you take it. According to recent findings from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the majority of uptake of PrEP in the United States has been among middle-aged, white, gay men. But the HIV epidemic has shifted, with the CDC noting continuous inequalities in the southern states and among young African Americans.

More concentrated efforts need to happen to ensure that those who can benefit from PrEP are able to access and receive it. Gilead, the company that produces Truvada, has a copay card available, where they pay up to $3600 a year in copays for those living under 500% of the national poverty level. For more information on PrEP, UNC campus health also serves as a great resource on campus, and students can get more information by making a free appointment with Student Wellness by emailing LetsTalkAboutIt@unc.edu or by calling (919) 962-WELL(9355).

For additional Resources on what to know about PrEP, and how to have a conversation with your provider, please see the resources below for information from the CDC. For those looking for a PrEP friendly provider, here is a list of providers in the State of North Carolina who actively prescribe PrEP.

Sources –

Gilead Copay Card: https://www.gileadadvancingaccess.com/copay-coupon-card

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention PrEP Resources: https://www.cdc.gov/hiv/risk/prep/index.html

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention PrEP Information: https://www.cdc.gov/hiv/basics/prep.html

List of PrEP Providers: https://www.med.unc.edu/ncaidstraining/files/PrEPProvidersforDownload.pdf/view

Are you accepting toxic food advice?

If you’re a health junkie or on social media at all, you’ve probably seen these terms: registered dietitian, nutritionist, nutrition coach, food guru, etc.. With so much information flying around there’s a lot of confusion over what it all means and who to listen to when it comes to nutrition advice. My answer? It all depends! All of these titles embody a love of food but there are some big differences in who to look to for food advice. Let’s set the record straight.

Registered Dietitian

Registered dietitians (RDs), also called registered dietitian nutritionists (RDNs), are recognized as experts of food and nutrition in the medical field. This is largely because of the many years these professionals spend studying the science behind food and how it affects the body. The government has regulations on who can call themselves a “registered dietitian”. This is to protect the public from people who present themselves as nutrition experts, but who have no formal training. For example, if someone with diabetes accepts nutrition advice from a nutritionist and it hurts them the nutritionist can not be held accountable. Registered dietitians, on the other hand, can lose their license or suffer fines for providing poor nutrition advice.  This is because RDs go through extensive training before they can practice. As of 2017, RDs are required to complete the following:

  • a bachelor’s or advanced degree in food science or human nutrition
  • supervised training and internships
  • pass the RD exam

After RDs are certified, they also have to complete annual training to maintain their credentials. This is my field of study and the past two years I’ve spent work toward a masters in this field has not been easy, but I’m so close to the finish line! From my studies, it seems RDs are excellent in a number of areas. They really understand how to help manage medical conditions and weight loss. They also can point out what diet trends are completely bogus with science.

Nutritionists/Nutrition Coach/Food Guru

Terms like nutritionist, nutrition coach and the like are not regulated. Anyone can use these labels. This isn’t to say they don’t have valuable nutrition knowledge. Many nutritionists have a wealth of nutrition knowledge from experience and self-study. Some of my favorite nutritionist on Facebook and Instagram provide excellent recipe ideas and encourage their followers to make healthy choices with amazing food photography. On the other hand, following nutrition advice from individuals not formally trained in food science can be dangerous. A nutritionist might not fully understand nutrition information or they may be misinformed. This can be dangerous if a nutritionist misinforms a large number of individuals, especially through social media platforms. Misinformation is particularly harmful when individuals are looking to receive information around serious medical conditions like diabetes and weight loss.

The next time you’re in search of food advice think about what you need! If you have a medical condition or you’re looking for advice on how to lose weight in a healthy way, you might want to look for advice from an RD. If you’re looking for meal prepping tips or fitness inspiration, a nutritionist can certainly help. There’s space for both in this food lovers community.