Tag: health public relations

Need some PR help for the cause of the month? The CDC will help

November is right around the corner, and that means soon it will be American Diabetes Month.

The CDC provides public health organizations with PR toolkits for causes of the month, but are these generic messages effective?

The CDC provides public health organizations with PR toolkits for causes of the month, but are these generic messages effective?

The CDC has a National Health Observance Toolkit ready to help health organizations promote American Diabetes Month. There are toolkits for every month (e.g. a breast cancer awareness toolkit for October).

Each toolkit contains sample press releases (with “insert your organization information” at the bottom), sample Twitter posts, e-cards, web badges (icons to insert into your own website promoting the cause), and lists of resources and hyperlinks to information. One sample tweet in the diabetes toolkit reads:

“You can do a lot to prevent diabetes, such as eating healthy and getting active. Learn more: http://bit.ly/2SGIwq . #nho”

The “Get Active” e-card says “Let’s pick activities we like that fit into our lives” on the inside.

These prefabricated press and social media materials may be welcomed by many overworked and understaffed public health groups; but, given their generic nature, how effective can they be? Would there be a way to alter the CDC toolkits to make them easily tailorable to specific populations?

Hurricane Earl and your health

CDC.gov promotes staying healthy during hurricanes.

CDC.gov gives tips for staying safe and healthy during hurricanes.

If you live anywhere between North Carolina and Maine, you know Hurricane Earl is headed your way. Maybe you bought some more bread and milk at the grocery yesterday. In the worst case scenario, you are packing up and leaving town.

But the CDC wants people to remember that weather preparedness doesn’t just mean boarding up the windows. They have a public relations campaign to help you, and your pets, prepare, evacuate, and recover. Don’t forget to stock up on prescription medicines, food, and a first aid kit, and make sure everyone in your family has a plan, says the CDC. Even though half a decade has passed since Hurricane Katrina hit, the images of people suffering should be enough to help bolster the CDC’s message.

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