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GOP Proposal for the American Health Care Act in the works

The Huffington Post reported this morning that the American Medical Association (AMA) is joining other big names in health and patient advocacy to push back against the GOP proposed health bill to replace The Affordable Care Act.

The AMA has historically been a key voice in health care, often opposing national level reform in order to protect clinical practice. However imperfect the 2010 roll-out of the Affordable Care Act (ACA/ObamaCare was), they agree that certain aspects of the ACA should not be rolled back now. In particular, they agreed that the ACA allowed for Medicaid expansion to cover more lower income individuals. They make the argument that the newly proposed bill provides government subsidies based on age, rather than income, which would be  problematic and cause loss of coverage and higher costs.

Other groups that are pushing back against this reform include the American Health Care Association, the American College of Physicians, the American Hospital Association, the National Center for Assisted Living, and the National Health Council. So who actually agrees with the proposed bill? The medical device industry, who claim that cutting taxes on medical devices will allow for growth in innovation that will eventually lead to better care. The counter argument to this claim, it seems, is that though quality of care must indeed improvement, this is irrelevant if people who need it cannot even afford coverage.

If you’d like to read up more on the proposal, the American Health Care Act, and how it differs from what is currently in place, check out Kaiser Health News’ article on the subject. They explain the funding changes the proposal suggests: how tax credits for insurance will change, the addition of caps to the current Medicaid funding, benefits fort he wealthy, penalties for those who have gaps in coverage, and a change to a free market system.

As expected, much is still unclear, but the calls to slow down the repeal process while details are ironed out appears to be quite loud.

Sources (linked in text): The Huffington Post, Kaiser Health News, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services