Doctor-Patient Communication, Interpersonal Communication, Research Findings , , , ,

Publication Planning: You have the data, now what?

Research, in any field, tends to be time-consuming and expensive. This is especially true of large-scale medical research trials. Therefore physicians and pharmaceutical companies, just like researchers in other fields, want to make optimal use of their research activities by producing as many publications from the resulting data as possible.

There are limits to how far these boundaries can be pushed, however. For example, duplicate publications are generally not permissible. This “double-dipping” includes publishing or presenting an identical work in multiple journals or at multiple conferences, but it also bars researchers from reworking a published piece in a way that does not contribute any new knowledge or insights to the results that were originally published.

One study usually measures a large number of variables and can therefore still be broken down into countless publications without violating sanctions against duplicate publications. For a clinical trial of a particular drug, for example, publications could focus on different outcome measures, such as the mechanism of action, safety, efficacy, economic considerations, administration, adherence, etc. Different publications could also examine these variable in various subgroups, such as pregnant women, the elderly, patients with certain co-morbidities, etc.   

In order to balance the desire for publication volume with the need to be ethically responsible by only publishing works that have scientific value, it is essential that large organizations and companies engage in publication planning activities. By convening a group of stakeholders at a publication planning meeting, an organization or company can lay out all of their available study data and determine what can and should be published from it.

In addition, gap analyses can be conducted to determine the topics or types of information that are missing in the current body of literature which can then serve as basis for future research studies intended to produce that information.

In this way, the cycle of medical research and publishing is continually pushed forward to produce new and valuable knowledge, both for the research community and for healthcare providers.

  • Jeannette Porter

    Deanna, great post– super useful!