Health Promotion, Interpersonal Communication , , , , , ,

RESEARCH SPOTLIGHT: MIKE NEWTON-WARD

Mike Newton-Ward, MSW, MPH, of the Gillings School of Global Public Health, at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), spoke with the Upstream writing team recently to share his lifelong experiences working with social marketing and how this form of communication is effective in public health.

Newton-Ward, an adjunct professor, received both a Masters in Social Work and a Masters in Public Health from UNC, and spent many years working with the N.C. Division of Public Health and the N.C. Department of Health and Human Services helping to create and implement various social marketing campaigns aimed at populations across the state. He retired in 2015 and is now an independent consultant with RTI International.

He spoke to the class to highlight the importance of social marketing campaigns in public health and discussed what steps are needed to ensure optimal effectiveness with selected target audiences.

One of the most valuable aspects of social marketing is that it takes feedback generated from the target audience (the group the campaign is intended for) and uses that data to help determine the layout of the campaign itself. Using this approach is key for garnering participant interest and ensuring improved outcomes.

Newton-Ward also discussed other aspects of social marketing, such as its interdisciplinary approach, and how the input of several fields is effective at campaign development, as well social marketing’s unique ability to influence behaviors in all directions. Since public health is primarily geared toward prevention at the population level, social marketing can be used to influence behaviors upstream through social or policy change. Likewise, it can also be used to produce changes downstream (hence, the name of our blog!), by treating or educating populations to change negative behaviors. Finally, social marketing can work sidestream, by allowing partner organizations to collaborate for promoting the best environment possible to ensure a continuum of positive outcomes.

Newton-Ward concluded his talk by answering questions from the audience and discussing the “simplified elicitation methodology,” a strategy used in many public health campaigns, which seeks to identify determinants of behavior by asking three pairs of questions, including:

  • “What makes a behavior harder or easier to do?”
  • “What are the good things and bad things that happen when one does the behavior?”
  • “Who would approve or disapprove of the behavior?”

 The answers generated from these questions are strong indicators for discovering and learning about target audience reactions, and are key drivers for developing successful campaigns.