In the News, Interpersonal Communication, Mental Health

Mental health Monday: Orange County gets dementia-friendly

Dementia friendly logoNovember is Alzheimer’s Disease Awareness Month and Family Caregivers Month, and both are being marked in Orange County by the rollout of the Orange County Dementia-Friendly Business Campaign.

That doesn’t mean that Orange County businesses want to drive you to dementia. Rather, participating businesses have committed to their consumer-facing employees taking a two-hour training in how to interact with people who may have dementia. Those businesses will also display the program’s logo near their entrances.

The idea is to recognize that more than 5 million Americans—more than 1 in 9 older people—are living with Alzheimer’s disease or another dementia. They have unique needs, especially when they interact with the community at large. Participating businesses are signaling that they are sensitive to those needs.

DeWana Anderson, a Carrboro veterinarian, said in a Chapel Hill News article that she found the training useful in working with some of the older people who bring their pets in for help.

“They may know what they want to say and they may know how they want to say it,” she said, “but when stuff hits them too fast, it can flabbergast them.”

The article said the staff at The Animal Hospital “learned through the training to ask simple questions and provide clear instructions to someone who has trouble understanding.”

The Dementia-Friendly Orange County site has more information on how to participate in the program, including a 19-minute training video. It’s aimed at teaching businesses how to be dementia-friendly, but which contains a lot of good tips for anybody who interacts with folks with dementia.

  • whchapma

    This is so great to see – plenty of people with dementia can still live fairly normal lives, as long as the community is supportive towards them. But if people respond with typical impatience and rudeness, that can definitely cause a manageable situation to spiral out of control.

  • liran2016

    It's great to see people with dementia are able to seek emotional and informational support at community level. How about financial support? I worry about the limited money will make this program not sustainable.